What is female ejaculation? Does it consist of pee or something else? Is female ejaculation real? And is it the same as male ejaculation?

You have questions – we have answers.

Female Ejaculation Explained

Female ejaculation occurs when the female prostate (or the Skene’s gland) and its surrounding erectile tissues (collectively known as the G spot) are stimulated. The G spot is not a literal “spot”” that can be found in the vagina, but rather an organ that can be felt through the vaginal wall. The size and shape of the female prostate are highly variable, as is its sensitivity, so no one stimulation technique will work for all women.

The female prostate is anatomically analogous to the male prostate, although it is smaller and more elongated in shape. The female prostate surrounds the urethral canal and contains glands that produce ejaculatory fluid, as well as ducts to expel the fluid into the urethral canal. This organ usually has approximately forty ducts and glands, which is three times more than those found in the male prostate.

Once the ejaculate moves from the female prostate into the urethral canal it is able to flow in two directions: into the bladder, which is known as retrograde ejaculation, or out of the urethral opening. When people ask “what is female ejaculation?”, they are usually referring to the expulsion of female ejaculate out of the urethral opening. The quantity of ejaculate can range anywhere from one tablespoon, to one cup, and even up to one liter in some women (if they experience multiple ejaculations in one session).

Is Female Ejaculation Real?

The short answer is “Yes”! Female ejaculation is indeed a real phenomenon. While many civilizations have documented female ejaculation over the past two thousand years, the female prostate was officially “discovered” by Dutch anatomist and physician Regnier de Graaf in 1672.

Uncertainty about the existence of female ejaculation largely stemmed from one study done in 1880 by Scottish gynecologist Alexander Skene, who discovered the two glands in the female urethra that emit prostatic fluid. Skene recognized the similarity of the glands to those found in the male prostate. However, he declared them to have no functional purpose and dubbed them a vestigial version of the male prostate.

Skene’s main interest in the glands was concerned with the fact that they can become clogged, and he developed a technique to drain them. Skene’s view of the female prostate and its glands as being nonfunctional contributed to the medical community’s stance that female ejaculation was not real. However, twentieth-century researchers reopened their investigation into the female prostate.

From 1982 to 1999 Dr. Zaviacic, a professor of pathology and forensic medicine at Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia, conducted extensive studies on the female prostate. Dr. Zaviacic research found that the female prostate has two primary functions: The first is exocrine (this refers to its production of prostatic fluid) and the second is neuroendocrine (this refers to its ability to produce hormones). While the primary function seems to be production, storage, and release of female ejaculate, its secondary function is as a producer of serotonin.

is female ejaculation real?

Isn’t it Just Women Peeing?

A lot of misinformation exists about what female ejaculate is made of. Female ejaculate is not made of the same substance as vaginal lubrication or pee. It has a similar chemical composition to men’s ejaculate, minus the sperm. Female ejaculate is composed of prostatic fluid, trace amounts of urine, and about 10% glucose. Its appearance is that of a clear, watery liquid, and the smell and taste of it can vary with the menstrual cycle.

Can Every Woman Ejaculate?

All women are born with the requisite biology for ejaculation. Whether or not they ever learn to use it to its fullest extent is another question. So, can every woman ejaculate? In fact, many women have ejaculated without knowing it and mistaken their ejaculate for either urine or vaginal secretions. Also, some women are not able to feel the sensation of ejaculating, while others unintentionally prevent themselves from ejaculating by “clamping down” when they begin to feel their prostate being stimulated. Women often report the sensation is similar to needing to pee.

There are also physical reasons a woman may not be capable of ejaculating, despite having the proper anatomy to do so. If a woman has had surgery in her pelvic region, her prostate or G spot may have been damaged. Too weak or too tight pelvic floor muscles can also present obstacles.

How to Teach a Woman to Ejaculate

It is easiest for a woman to ejaculate if her partner is the one doing the stimulation. Consider that it takes time, practice, and adequate lubrication to teach a woman how to ejaculate.

First, you need to find the G spot. Stimulation of the G spot is what most commonly leads to female ejaculation. The G spot is located on the upper wall of the vagina. You can press upwards and make a “come hither motion” across the smooth area right behind the pelvic bone (here’s some help in finding the G spot). Remember to have your female partner keep breathing throughout your exploration to stay relaxed, and have her make note of any sensations she feels and in what areas they occur. Stimulate the G spot with slow, circular movements and firm pressure from your fingers. Do not try to rush this step. Spend time slowly stimulating the female prostate (all areas), and feel it grow harder or larger as you stimulate it. This is the sign that the ejaculate is building up.

Once the G spot is engorged to a level where she feels closer to orgasm, she will likely also get the sensation of needing to pee. This is the results of the ejaculate building up even more. Make sure she is breathing and relaxing into this urge. Once aroused to the point of her wanting to have the orgasm, she can try to push out the ejaculate.

Pushing the ejaculate out with the pelvic floor muscles will feel like she is forcing herself to pee. The pushing should be a thrust for release and a bit forceful, but not a clampdown. It is also worth noting that many women cannot ejaculate if there is an object in their vagina, whether that be a penis, dildo or finger. If she is still not able to ejaculate, go back to stimulating the G spot and try again in a bit.

Female Ejaculation and Pregnancy

Female ejaculation and pregnancy can be closely linked. Many women report that ejaculating is easier when they are pregnant, and the quantity of liquid is much more profuse. It is not harmful to the mother or the baby to stimulate the G spot with gentle intercourse or a sex toy.

Some pregnant women and their partners also wonder if female ejaculation during pregnancy is safe. The answer is “Yes”. Unless your doctor tells you that you need to be careful because of challenges during your pregnancy, you can enjoy female ejaculation and pregnancy to your heart’s content.

How a Sex Coach Can Help

The key to female ejaculation is to fully accept your bodily fluids and remain relaxed throughout the process. A sex coach can teach you embrace your bodily responses, stay connected to your breath and sensations, and listen to your body.

Learning how to achieve female ejaculation is an individual journey for every woman. It is and one of the best things you can do is to explore your body, become familiar with your G spot – and all the pleasures it has to offer.

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Danielle Harel
Danielle Harel, PhD is the Co-creator of the Somatica® Method and the Co-Founder of the Somatica® Institute. She trains coaches in the Somatica® Method of Sex and Relationship Coaching. She has her own private practice in Sunnyvale, where she supports her clients in having amazing sex and relationships as well as passion-fueled lives. She has published original research on Orgasmic Birth and is the co-author of two books, Cockfidence - The Definitive Guide to Being the Man You Want to Be and Driving Women Wild and Making Love Real - The Intelligent Couples Guide to Lasting Intimacy and Passion. Danielle Has her Masters in Clinical Social Work From Haifa University in Israel and her PhD in Human Sexuality from the Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality (IASHS). She is a Clinical Sexologist and a Certified Sexological Bodyworker. Danielle is a Certified Body Positive Facilitator and took many trainings in embodied and mindfulness based therapeutic approaches such as Hakomi.