A female G spot orgasm is an orgasm that originates from stimulation of the G spot. A male G spot orgasm emanates from the prostate. How to have and how to give a G spot orgasm is the focus of much debate – but we’re here to help clear it up.

History of the G Spot Orgasm

In 1905, Sigmund Freud suggested women had two different kinds of orgasms: clitoral and vaginal. He believed clitoral orgasms were an adolescent phenomenon, and vaginal orgasms were the proper orgasm for a mature woman to have.

In the 1970’s feminists pushed back against these antiquated ideas, claiming there was no such thing as a vaginal orgasm – and scientists, such as Masters and Johnson, agreed. This was an important moment of empowerment for women because at least 70% of women do need some kind of clitoral stimulation to orgasm.

These days, we have a much better understanding of women’s orgasms and know they can originate from different points in the body. They can arise from the clitoris (which is outside of the vagina), from the G spot, and the cervix (both inside of the vagina). Each of these routes to orgasm travels up a different nerve pathway, so a combination of all of these forms of stimulation can make for an even more intense orgasm.

The Female G Spot Orgasm

Female G spot orgasm comes from pressure inside of the vagina directed toward the G spot. Since there is a very thin wall between the vagina and the anal passage, Female G spot orgasm can also come from anal intercourse. This can occur when the penis or dildo is in the right angle to stimulate the G spot through the vaginal wall. Some women can have a G spot orgasm from G spot stimulation alone, while others need simultaneous G spot and clitoral stimulation. One woman described this combination as the clitoris being like the “fuse,” while her G spot was the “bomb.”

Do Guys Have a G Spot – And Does the Male G Spot Orgasm Exist?

Many people question: Do guys have a G spot and Does the male G spot orgasm exist? 

To be clear: Men don’t have a G spot. But they have a prostate, which is the analogous organ in a man’s body. A male orgasm brought on by the stimulation of the prostate is sometimes referred to as a male G spot orgasm. Prostate stimulation can be done with a penis, dildo or fingers, and can cause orgasm in men even without any penis stimulation.

What Does a Female G Spot Orgasm Feel Like?

A female G spot orgasm can be extremely intense and is more likely than a clitoral orgasm to spread throughout the whole body. Right before you have a G spot orgasm, you might feel like you are going to pee. This is due to stimulation to the G spot – which can also lead to female ejaculation. Female ejaculation can happen at the same time as a G spot orgasm, or separately – and in rare cases can also be brought on solely by clitoral stimulation.

 

How to Have a G Spot Orgasm

To have a G spot orgasm, it’s essential to be in tune with your body. In addition to taking plenty of time to awaken the G spot, you want to consciously relax your body. Have your partner sensuously warm up your entire body, including your vulva and vagina. If you commonly orgasm through clitoral stimulation, try having at least one clitoral orgasm before beginning your G spot exploration.

One way to get more sensation from your G spot is to make sounds while it is being stimulated. Making sounds helps relax the muscles in your vagina and allows you to move towards orgasm. G spot stimulation and orgasm can also be very emotional; you may cry, laugh, or scream. Both you and your partner should stay present for whatever arises, including deep emotions — from joyous ecstasy to tears, or a combination of the two.

How to Give a G Spot Orgasm

If you want to know how to give a G spot orgasm, make sure you start with the instructions above on how to establish G spot sensitivity. If your partner already has a developed G spot, you can use some of the above-mentioned tools to awaken and warm-up the G spot each time you have sex. 

You can locate your partner’s G spot by placing one or two fingers inside the vagina, penetrate a bit beyond your second knuckle, and then bending your fingers in a “come here” gesture. There does not need to be much in and out motion; just curling and uncurling the fingers does the trick.

Use Lubrication. Women’s capacity for lubrication changes throughout their lifetime and their menstrual cycle. Just because they aren’t wet doesn’t mean they are not aroused. Check with your partner about her lubrication. If she does not lubricate easily on her own, keep a lubricant nearby. Lubricants with a pump spout are best because they are easy to access.

Work your way back. It is best to start with fingertips at the opening of the vagina and make slow circles. Try different pressures and speeds, and listen to her feedback. Continue with slow circles at the opening, then across the bumpy part, and finally directly on the G spot. Remember, the G spot is only one of the pleasure spots on a woman. You can explore touch throughout a woman’s vagina to see which spots are best for her.

Come hither. The most effective G spot maneuver is the “come hither” motion, where you pull one, two, or three fingers across the G spot. Some women like the “come here” motion right on top of the bumpy part, while others prefer it on the smoother part just past the pubic bone. If you are in the right spot, you will be able to hook your fingers behind her pubic bone.

Tap. Try inserting your fingers and tapping directly on the G spot. You can start gently and work your way up, seeing how much pressure it can take. You can also vary the speed.

Can a Sex Coach Help You with a G Spot Orgasm?

If you’ve tried to achieve G spot orgasm but can’t quite get there, you might want to talk to a professional sex coach about any roadblocks you or your partner have. 

If you need a sex coach to show you more directly how to stimulate the G spot and have a G spot orgasm, you might want to work with a sexological bodyworker or a sexual surrogate instead.

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Danielle Harel
Danielle Harel, PhD is the Co-creator of the Somatica® Method and the Co-Founder of the Somatica® Institute. She trains coaches in the Somatica® Method of Sex and Relationship Coaching. She has her own private practice in Sunnyvale, where she supports her clients in having amazing sex and relationships as well as passion-fueled lives. She has published original research on Orgasmic Birth and is the co-author of two books, Cockfidence - The Definitive Guide to Being the Man You Want to Be and Driving Women Wild and Making Love Real - The Intelligent Couples Guide to Lasting Intimacy and Passion. Danielle Has her Masters in Clinical Social Work From Haifa University in Israel and her PhD in Human Sexuality from the Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality (IASHS). She is a Clinical Sexologist and a Certified Sexological Bodyworker. Danielle is a Certified Body Positive Facilitator and took many trainings in embodied and mindfulness based therapeutic approaches such as Hakomi.